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Jane

In July 1960, at the age of 26, Jane Goodall traveled from England to what is now Tanzania and ventured into the little-known world of wild chimpanzees. Through nearly 60 years of groundbreaking work, Dr. Jane Goodall has not only shown us the urgent need to protect chimpanzees from extinction; she has also redefined species conservation to include the needs of local people and the environment. Today she travels the world, speaking about the threats facing chimpanzees and environmental crises, urging each of us to take action on behalf of all living things and the planet we share.   "Once people realize their power to make a difference in the lives of their families, communities and environment, there’s no going back—only...

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Ellen

Dr. Ellen Ochoa joined NASA in 1988 and in 1993 she became the first Hispanic woman to go to space when she served on the nine-day mission aboard the space shuttle Discovery. She has flown in space four times, logging nearly 1,000 hours in orbit. Ochoa is a private pilot. And she is a classical flutist. She even played her flute aboard the space shuttle. Ochoa often travels to schools to speak to students about her experiences in space. She encourages them to set big goals. "Don't be afraid to reach for the stars," she says. "I believe a good education can take you anywhere on Earth and beyond."

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Paris

Paris Hilton is one of the most well known names when it comes to gossip columns, social media, and early 2000 celebrity drama. Lately, she has become an activist for not only animal rights but also uses her voice to fight abuse and preaches the importance of mental health. She has struggled through being a young woman whos life has been harshly judged and has grown into an empowering virago who proves women are multifacested.

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Hastiin

Hastiin Klah was an indigenous two-spirit master sand painter, chanter, weaver and healer. There are four genders in Diné tradition and Klah was considered a Nádleehi (one who changes). Klah single-handedly saved the Navajo weaving tradition in the face of religious persecution and helped pave the way for today’s modern LGBTQ2+ and indigenous two-spirited community. 

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